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Creations


Quidam


Création

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Musique
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Expérience

Prologue
German Wheel
Marelle
Diabolo
Dans l'Air
Aerial Contortion
Hula Hoop (John)
Skipping Ropes
Aerial Hoops
Entr'acte (Égaré)
Handbalancing
Darts (John)
Spanish Webs
Coatrack (John)
Statue
Banquine
Epilogue

Réserve
Juggling
Dance Trapeze


Retiré
Aerial Strap (Solo)
Manipulation
Hoops
Aerial Strap (Duo)
Cyr Wheel
Cloud Swing
Trapeze Duplex
Diabolos

Odyssey

Itinéraire
Visuals
Audio/Visual
Features

 

Experience
Spanish Webs
(1996+)


Breaking with tradition, Quidam presents the Spanish webs as a group act. Seven artists fly over the stage, attached to a trolley on an overhead track. Suddenly, time stands still as the acrobats, in turn or as a group, drop into the void, stopped only by the ropes looped around their waists or ankles. The audience, bewitched, cannot take its eyes off these wizards of the ropes, and only gradually shakes off the spell once the spectacle is over.

The overhead track brings a series of ropes onto the stage, each with a performer attached, high over our heads. And thus begins the incredible Spanish Web act, with acrobats climbing up and down the ropes, tying them around their bodies and flying through the air. Also known as Corde Lisse, the Spanish Web is an aerial apparatus consisting of a cotton rope stranded or braided to a 3-to-5 centimeter diameter that hangs vertically upon which an acrobat executes various tricks and moves. The Spanish Web may be used with a loop into which the acrobat can insert either the hand or foot to accomplish various feats while rotating, with the help of rotational push provided by an assistant on the ground. Usually performed solo, this discipline was modified by Cirque du Soleil to be a group performance for Quidam.

[Originally, the Father Character was a principal soloist in the Spanish Web act, portrayed by Daniel Touchette. He was the one who originally tied the rope in many loops around his body, ultimately letting it roll him precariously down to the ground. As part of the story, this act began the transformation of the Father character into a more open, carefree person. Later, as the Father became the Juggler, his change is seen there. In some instances, the climax of this act was depicted by the character of Fritz/Target, constantly wanting to be involved and meeting everyone with a smile. He climbed the ropes as the porter on the ground began to spin them. Then he flies off, attached to the main rope only by his ankle, laughing hilariously as he spun overhead.]

 

• "Spanish Webs"


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