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Luzia

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Creations


Luzia


Création

Concepteurs
Scénographie
Musique
Personages

Expérience

Prologue
Opening
Hoop Diving
Adagio Quatuor
Cyr Wheel &
Trapeze
Handbalancing
Fútbol Freestyle
Intermission
Pole Dance
360° Swing
Aerial Straps
Juggling
Contortion
Russian Swings
Fiesta Finale

Odyssey

Itinéraire
Visuals
Audio/Visual
Features

 

Experience
Opening


As the morning sun rises, a woman and a metallic horse run together to awake this imaginary Mexico where the journey of the traveler will take place. The running woman spreads her “butterfly wings” in a tribute to the annualmigratory journey of the monarch butterfly from southern Canada to central Mexico.

A young girl and a horse make a mad dash through the garden of cempaùchil, as this beautiful environment springs to life like a wind-up curio. Speed, you may recall, is one of the show’s themes, and it’s only natural to associate Mexico with this idea. One needs only to call to mind the uncanny ability of the Tarahumara, a reclusive Native American people hailing from the mountains of northwestern Mexico. Living in widely dispersed settlements, the fleet-footed Tarahumara developed a tradition of long- distance running, covering more than 300 kilometers nonstop across treacherous terrain over a period of two days with minimal footwear. The running girl is the embodiment of these people’s spirit.

Animals too play a prominent role in Mexican lore and mythology. Horses were introduced to Mexico by the Spaniards and adopted by native populations. Revolutionary leader Emiliano Zapata’s favorite horse, As de Oro (Ace of Diamonds), and the beautiful chestnut stallion named SieteLeguas (Seven Leagues) that belonged to Pancho Villa, are part of the Mexican collective consciousness and have inspired many heroic songs, known as corridos. With their long history as rancheros (ranchers) and vaqueros (cowboys), Mexicans are now recognized as among the best equestrians in the world.

The pair provides a rather low-key, but culturally relevant and beautiful opening to the show. As the Running Girl spreads her wings, she also personifies one of the ties that bind Canada to Mexico – the annual flight of the monarch butterfly. (Each wing is 6 meters long, is made of silk, and requires 40 meters of material.)

 

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